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20100914
20100914
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and in congress is if you propose something that's bold, that touches these third rails, the other side will use it as a political weapon against you so don't dare try. we have to get off, if we court start tackling the fiscal problem, it will tack ale lot. what i do the point i'm trying to make is we do this now and get our prosperity agenda. what i mean when i say this is my plan says nothing changes for anybody 35 and above. -- 55 and above, so if you are 10 years away from retiring we can guarantee your benefit, if you are 54 and below you know the programs won't be the samement you know that the social insurance safety net system we have is imploding. we need to reform it to fix it. i use a few values and principals on how i fix those things am i go kif-- i can give you details if you like. the point i make is do it now, preema debt crisis, if he kick the can down the road it will be austerity to everybody. tax increases to current workers that is the pain plan we should avoid that. >> rose: i meant by dismantle, just dismantle in the traditional way that it works. in other words, you can u
audible on wall street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now w
's collapse and the ensuing crisis led to a new push to make banks safer. in the u.s. a sweeping financial reform bill signed into law in july imposed stricter capital requirements on banks, yet largely left u.s. regulators to determine those levels. now new international standards may be on the way. this weekend in basil, switzerland, central bankers from 27 countries including ben bernanke agreed to new rules that included substantially raising amount of capital that banks must hold in reserve. banks in the u.s. currently must hold about 2% of their assets in capital or equity to absorb losses in the event of runs or financial panics. under the so-called basil-3 agreement the new international standard would be 7% of assets. but banks would have until 2019 to implement it. the head of the european central bank said the move would help protect against another meltdown. >> what we have decided is commensurate to permit when we have all the standards in place to make the banking sector at a global level much more resilient. and i would say we think we are commensurate to the shocks that we
help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment, " one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and with contributions by viewers like you. thank you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: i am sorry. yes, you can keep rolling. i am trying to introduce the coach, and i got distracted, so let me do the introduction first, and then i will come back to this ring, and i think when you see this, you will understand for the first time what i was distracted. he is a coach with in the orleans saints. just months after hurricane katrina, he knew he was getting into something much bigger than sports, and he led the saints to their first super bowl victory against the colts. it helped lift the spirits of those there. his new book is called "home team: coaching the saints and new orleans back to life," in his book is about to make its debut, as you might imagine, on "the new york ti
jailed in teheran, about today's release and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions a
gathered to denounce reports that copies of the koran was burned in the u.s. in delhi, the u.s. condemned the violence and anyone in america who insulted the koran. >> i strongly condemn that such acts as disrespectful and unrepresentative of american values. the deliberate destruction of any holy book is a horrible act. >> but kashmir is an indian challenge. the prime minister with military commanders is deeply distressed by the latest violence. but this government seems powerless to stop it. kashmir has been divided between india and pakistan for more than six decades. it remains a dangerous tension in south asia and a rallying cry for asian militants. mylan unrest has implications for stability and india and pakistan and further appeals in afghanistan. >> the man behind the controversial plans for muslim community center near ground zero has said extremists of any faith must not be allowed to hijack this course. the imam says it's vital to have a platform where the voice of moderate muslims can be amplified. many americans are opposed to the center. >> in recent weeks the imam has trie
and the doubters. it george mitchell gave a good assessment after the first session of talks. >> all of us reaffirm our commitment to reaching a shared goal for the just, lasting, and lasting peace. >> -- proper peace. >> the issue that is sticking is the settlements. the palestinians are threatening to walk away unless there is no more settlements. the israelis say this is not possible. the prime minister is pinned in by a coalition pressing him not to give ground. how much progress is made on the issue has not emerged. the parties have sat together for two long sessions and will return to jerusalem for more talks tomorrow. so, no big announcements and the best anyone can hope for is that they are continuing. there will be many long hard days of communications and negotiation if this is to bear fruit. >> she has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year but today the u.s. female hiker was reported -- was released from iran. she and her companions were accused of spying. they insist that they got lost in iraq. according to her mother, she has been denied treatment for serious health pr
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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